100 Years of Books

100 Years of Books

This began in 2014, it continues in 2015 and I suspect it will roll on for a good while after that.

I’m trying to cover 100 years, reading 100 books by 100 different authors.

I have read 63- so I have 37 to go!

1850 –
1851 –
1852 –
1853 – Bleak House by Charles Dickens
1854 – Ruth Hall by Fanny Fern
1855 – North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell
1856 – The Sad Fortunes of the Reverend Amos Barton by George Eliot
1857 –
1858 –
1859 –
1860-
1861 – East Lynne by Ellen Wood
1862 –
1863 – The Water Babies by Charles Kingsley
1864 – Henry Dunbar by Mary Elizabeth Brandon
1865 – Can You Forgive Her? by Anthony Trollope
1866 – Griffith Gaunt by Charles Reade
1867 – Cometh Up as a Flower by Rhoda Broughton
1868 –
1869 – Letters from my Windmill by Alphonse Daudet
1870 – Man and Wife by Wilkie Collins
1871 – Desperate Remedies by Thomas Hardy
1872 –
1873 –
1874 –
1875 – The Usurper by Judith Gautier
1876 –
1877 – Pendower: a story of Cornwall in the time of Henry VIII by Marianne Filleul
1878 – Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
1879 – Wired Love by Ella Cheever Thayer
1880 –
1881 – Policy and Passion by Rosa Praed
1882 –
1883 –
1884 – Jill by Amy Dillwyn
1885 – Called Back by Hugh Conway
1886 – A World of Girls by L T Meade
1887 – The Canterville Ghost by Oscar Wilde
1888 – The Romance of a Shop by Amy Levy
1889 –
1890 –
1891 – Mona and True Love’s Reward by Mrs Georgie Sheldon
1892 –
1893 – In the Vine Country by Somerville & Ross
1894 – Esther Waters by George Moore
1895 – The Young Pretenders by Edith Henrietta Fowler
1896 –
1897 –
1898 – Victoria by Knut Hamsun
1899 – Red Pottage by Mary Cholmondeley
1900 –
1901 –
1902 –
1903 – The Girl Behind the Keys by Tom Gallon
1904 – The Masquerader – or John Chilcote M. P. – by Katherine Cecil Thurston
1905 –
1906 –
1907 – The Twelfth Hour by Ada Leverson
1908 – Crossriggs by Jane and Mary Findlater
1909 –
1910 – The Getting of Wisdom by Henry Handel Richardson
1911 – Mr Perrin and Mr Traill by Hugh Walpole
1912 – Alexander’s Bridge by Willa Cather
1913 –
1914 –
1915 – I Pose by Stella Benson
1916 –
1917 –
1918 – The Man Who Lost Himself by Henry de Veere Stacpoole
1919 – The Tunnel by Dorothy Richardson
1920 – The Adventurous Lady by J C Snaith
1921 –
1922 –
1923 – None-Go-By by Mrs Alfred Sidgwick
1924 – Still She Wished for Company by Margaret Irwin
1925 – The Mother’s Recompense by Edith Wharton
1926 – Lolly Willowes by Sylvia Townsend Warner
1927 – Red Sky at Morning by Margaret Kennedy
1928 – Grey Mask by Patricia Wentworth
1929 – Modesta by G B Stern
1930 – The Diary of a Provincial Lady by E M Delafield
1932 – Three Fevers by Leo Walmsley
1933 –
1934 – Wild Strawberries by Angela Thirkell
1935 – Four Gardens by Margery Sharp
1936 – Deborah by Esther Kreitman
1937 – Enchanter’s Nightshade by Ann Bridge
1938 – The Wild Geese by Bridget Boland
1939 – Nine Pounds of Luggage by Maud Parrish
1940 – The English Air by D E Stevenson
1941 – The Castle on the Hill by Elizabeth Goudge
1942 – The Vienna Melody by Ernst Lothar
1943 – Thus Far and No Further – or Rungli-Rungliot – by Rumer Godden
1944 –
1945 – Haxby’s Circus by Katharine Susannah Prichard
1946 –
1947 – The Bull Calves by Naomi Mitchison
1948 – Murder in the Telephone Exchange by June Wright
1949 – The Auction Sale by C. H. B. Kitchin

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7 thoughts on “100 Years of Books

  1. Can i offer you the thought of The Wide Wide World by Mrs Wetherell, published in 1850? A bestseller, even mentioned in Little Women, when Jo reads her copy….
    Still a fascinating book, and an amazing insight into America in those times..
    .I can feel yet another re-read coming on! ..
    .I wrote about it in a blog called ‘The ups and downs of being a woman..’.

    Like

  2. What a fantastic challenge! Am thinking of cribbing it for next year – it looks so much fun, and a great way to engineer diverse reading that you might not otherwise pick up 🙂

    Like

    1. Crib away! I’m progressing slowly, but discovering some interesting books along the way.

      Most others – like Lisa @ TBR313 who is doing the same period – allow more than one book an author, and you will find many others out there (including me at my old home) who have read – or are still reading – the 20th Century.

      Liked by 1 person

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