Daffodils: A Seasonal Collection

My heart is a garden tired with autumn,
Heaped with bending asters and dahlias heavy and dark,
In the hazy sunshine, the garden remembers April,
The drench of rains and a snow-drop quick and clear as a spark;
Daffodils blowing in the cold wind of morning,
And golden tulips, goblets holding the rain—
The garden will be hushed with snow, forgotten soon, forgotten—
After the stillness, will spring come again?

‘The Garden’ by Sarah Teasdale

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Daffodil Dish by Della Robbia Pottery

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“I went outside mournful, and I hit pure air. The air was full of birdsong. I went outside expecting rain but it was sunny, it was so suddenly, so openly sunny, with so sharp a spring light coming off the river, that I went down the side of the riverbank and sat in among the daffodils.

From ‘Girl Meets Boy’ by Ali Smith

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‘Daffodils in the Inglenook’ by Stephen Darbishire

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She did not look at the daffodils.
They didn’t mean anything.
She looked at the daffodils.
She said, ‘Thank you for the daffodils

Hilda Doolittle

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“I never saw daffodils so beautiful. They grew among the mossy stones about and about them, some rested their heads upon these stones as on a pillow for weariness and the rest tossed and reeled and danced and seemed as if they verily laughed with the wind that blew upon them over the lake, they looked so gay ever glancing ever changing. This wind blew directly over the lake to them. There was here and there a little knot and a few stragglers a few yards higher up but they were so few as not to disturb the simplicity and unity and life of that one busy highway.”

Dorothy Wordsworth

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Undyed linen embroidered with silver and gilt-silver yarns and spangles in daffodil scroll pattern, trimmed with metallic lace. Reconstructed with non-matching linen ground.

Possibly worn by Grizell Wodehouse (d. 1635), the wife of Sir Philip Wodehouse. According to family legend, the jacket belonged to Queen Elizabeth and was given as a gift when she visited the Kimberly estate in 1578 for the knighting of Roger Wodehouse.

From The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston

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‘Daffodil Hound’ by Rich Skipworth

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“I want to steal something.

In the hall the night-light’s on, the long space glows gently pink; I walk, one foot set carefully down, then the other, without creaking, along the runner, as if on a forest floor, sneaking, my heart quick, through the night house. I am out of place. This is entirely illegal.

Down past the fish-eye on the hall wall, 1 can see my white shape, of tented body, hair down my back like a mane, my eyes gleaming. I like this. I am doing something, on my own. The active, is it a tense?

Tensed. What I would like to steal is a knife, from the kitchen, but I’m not ready for that.
I reach the sitting room, door’s ajar, slip in, leave the door a little open. A squeak of wood, but who’s near enough to hear? I stand in the room, letting the pupils of my eyes dilute, like a cat’s or owl’s.

Old perfume, cloth dust fill my nostrils. There’s a slight mist of light, coming through the cracks around the closed drapes, from the searchlight outside, where two men doubtless patrol, I’ve seen them, from above, from behind my curtains, dark shapes, cut-outs.
Now I can see outlines, gleams: from the mirror, the bases of the lumps, the vases, the sofa looming like a cloud at dusk.

What should I take? Something that will not be missed. In the wood at midnight, a magic flower. A withered daffodil, not one from the dried arrangement. The daffodils will soon be thrown out, they’re beginning to smell. Along with Serena’s stale fumes, the stench of her knitting.

I grope, find an end table, feel. There’s a clink, I must have knocked something. I find the daffodils, crisp at the edges where they’ve dried, limp towards the stems, use my fingers to pinch. I will press this, somewhere. Under the mattress. Leave it there, for the next woman, the one who comes after me, to find.”

From ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ by Margaret Atwood

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Daffodil Cake by  Juliet Stalwood Cakes and Biscuits

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Thou yellow trumpeter of laggard Spring!
Thou herald of rich Summer’s myriad flowers!
The climbing sun with new recovered powers
Does warm thee into being, through the ring
Of rich, brown earth he woos thee, makes thee fling
Thy green shoots up, inheriting the dowers
Of bending sky and sudden, sweeping showers,
Till ripe and blossoming thou art a thing
To make all nature glad, thou art so gay;
To fill the lonely with a joy untold;
Nodding at every gust of wind to-day,
To-morrow jewelled with raindrops. Always bold
To stand erect, full in the dazzling play
Of April’s sun, for thou hast caught his gold.

‘To an Early Daffodil’ by Amy Lowell

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 Daffodil  (1910-12) a textile design by Franz von Zülow

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“As we all know, the only way to plant daffodils is to pile them onto a tray, and then to run out into the orchard and hurl the tray into the air, planting them exactly where they fall. There may be other, less orthodox methods; if so they should be spurned. The tray, the ecstatic gesture … that is the only sure road to success.”

 Beverley Nichols

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‘Daffodils and Violets’ by Mabel Tregaskis

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“In the forest, in the forest, silence had cast a spell over all things. She plucked a great bouquet of daffodils and snowdrops, and tenderly held them to her, and tenderly kissed their fresh spring faces. She did not sing at all, but sat silent, expectant, and wondering, till her flowers faded and withered in her hands.”

Katherine Mansfield

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23 thoughts on “Daffodils: A Seasonal Collection

  1. So lovely, as always. I saw daffodils in the grocery store today and meant to buy them, and forgot! I’ve been reading about Amy Lowell … she was so well known in her day but so forgotten now, and a very interesting Bostonian!

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  2. Thank you so much. What a lovely collection. Here’s one I read recently from George Szirtes:

    “Daffodils
    I am bothered by the nagging translucency
    of these daffodil petals in their Busby Berkeley outfits
    of six yellow skirts around a frilled bell
    darkening to its centre, their stern stalks bunched
    in the glass on the sill by a warm brown wall, ”

    Your blog is always a delight.

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  3. Thank you ever so much Jane for the quote from Dorothy Wordsworth’s Grasmere Journal! It appears in her entry of April 15, 1802. Love & Regards to you!

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  4. Gorgeous, Jane, utterly gorgeous. I have said it before (and no doubt will again!) but these portmanteau posts of yours seem like such a generous gift to us. I always open them like a fabulous present, wrapped layer by layer, each one needing to be savoured. And so brilliant to have Dorothy’s journal, I assume the inspiration for William’s universally known. It was hard to pick any ‘this was my favourite’ – this was a selection where every single daffodil chocolate needed to be savoured – but, perhaps, the glory of the time-lapse, as something never normally glimpsed. That made me smile wider and wider and also brought tears, so gorgeous seeing that dynamic blooming life!

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  5. Lovely! I really needed a post like this today, when it’s especially dreary and I can only just see the green tips of my daffodils coming out. We’re still weeks away from any blossoms. My favorite is the Katherine Mansfield quote, no doubt.

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  6. We are in autumn and just about to put daffodil bulbs in the ground and they are blooming up there. So funny how they know the difference between the hemispheres. Lovely post and the Daffodil Hound is my very favourite. Beautiful illustrations.

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